Wat is PDF Spiritual FERNANDO PESSOA DISQUIET PDF

FERNANDO PESSOA DISQUIET PDF

A better title might be The Books of Disquiet. Each entry in this fictional diary of one Bernardo Soares represents an attempt to create a distinct biography. The Book of Disquiet (Penguin Classics) [Fernando Pessoa, RICHARD Zenith] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The prizewinning. The Book of Disquiet: The Complete Edition [Fernando Pessoa, Jerónimo Pizarro , Margaret Jull Costa] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

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The Book of Disquiet: The Complete Edition by Fernando Pessoa

Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The Book of Disquiet: The Complete Edition by Fernando Pessoa. Fernando Pessoa was many writers in one. Fernahdo attributed his prolific writings to a wide range of alternate selves, each of which had a distinct biography, ideology.

When he died inPessoa left behind a trunk filled with unfinished and unpublished writings, among which were the remarkable pages that make up his posthumous masterpiece, The Book of Disquie Fernando Pessoa was many writers in one.

When he died inPessoa left behind a trunk filled with unfinished and unpublished writings, among which were the remarkable pages that make up his posthumous masterpiece, The Book of Disquietan astonishing work that, in George Steiner’s words, “gives to Lisbon the haunting spell of Joyce’s Dublin or Kafka’s Prague. Part intimate diary, part prose poetry, part descriptive narrative, captivatingly translated by Richard Zenith, The Book of Disquiet is one of the greatest works of the twentieth century.

Books to give you hope: The Book of Disquiet by Fernando Pessoa

Kindle Editionpages. Published August 29th by New Directions first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about The Book of Disquietplease sign up. Which translation shall I read then?

If you don’t speak Portuguese I would recommend the translation by Richard Zenith, as he is of Portuguese descent, editor of one of the Portuguese …more If you don’t speak Portuguese I would recommend the translation by Richard Zenith, as he is of Portuguese descent, editor of one of the Portuguese versions and considered by many one of the greatest Pessoa’s expert. I see that the Penguin classic version of the book has pages, while the Serpent’s tail version of it has only pages.

What is the reason for this difference in page number? Ryan I can think of a couple of reasons for this: Future editors, as obsessed as they are with completionism, included more than the author intended sometimes depending on the version.

Richard Zenith includes not only fragments Fernando Pessoa didn’t want in, but also author notes, and letters to friends concerning the book. A ferando way to compare the sizes of different versions would be with word counts. See all 6 questions about The Book of Disquiet…. Lists with This Book. Here is pezsoa only Portuguese literary joke I know: Who are the four greatest Portuguese poets of the 20th century?

Trust me, it’s funny.

The Book of Disquiet: The Complete Edition

But it does take a little explaining. Of these four, his greatest creation–and perhaps the heteronym closest to Pessoa’s self–is Bernardo Soares, the “author” of The Book of Disquiet. The Book of Disquietif not unique, is close to it.

It is a little like a novel, often like a collection of prose poems, and often like a series of aphorisms and philosophical reflections. The heteryonum that is Soares enables Pessoa to communicate a disciplined, definite vision of the world, necessarily limited in scope, but intensified and concentrated.

In this sense, it resembles Roman and English satire, its authorial mask as carefully crafted and resonant as those of Horace and Juvenal, Pope and Swift. Soares, however, takes no interest in vice, let alone the reform of humankind; in fact, he seems to care little about humanity in general, or people in particular.

It is here that the novelistic aspect of this work becomes interesting. Soares is a shy, isolated man, a clerk at a Lisbon commercial firm who adds up columns of figures, and seems to do little else. Although he mourns his colleagues when they pass away, he never seems to communicate with them when they are alive; the closest he seems to get to fellowship are his encounters with the waiter in the little cafe where he eats his nightly dinner and consumes his nightly bottle of wine.

At first, we feel sorry for him, for we feel his great isolation and are moved by his great passion and profound love for beauty which he can only express through his journal. Slowly, however, we begin to see that this isolation is a personal and artistic choice, a way of refining his art and his being. If he cares about human beings at all, it is only because they are useful adjuncts to his own magnificent loneliness, because they resonate as discrete elements of the poet’s imagination, much as a certain play of light on a Lisbon street may reflect one particular color of the canvas that is the poet’s consciousness.

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There is of course a great difference. Maldoror could only have been produced by a very young man hiding beneath a very old mask. His persona is a posture of isolation through which he begins to know himself. The Book of Disquieton the other hand, is the work of someone who knows himself well, and cares only about reaching a kind of existential purity: Soares is a monk of the poetic mind, for whom aloneness is a vocation.

Its fruit, this memorable book, is rare and delicious, filled with vivid descriptions, evocative language, and refined reflections. View all 35 comments. Humans are social beings, to the extent that those who prefer solitude to the company of others are usually perceived as troubled individuals, outside of the norm; it took me a long time to feel comfortable with being alone, with dampening the guilt that flared up in me every time I begged off going out with a group of friends.

It is always a welcome reinforcement when I come across a book penned by a fellow recluse—and The Book of Disquiet could be a solitary soul’s bible, so powerfully does it Humans are social beings, to the extent that those who prefer solitude to the company of others are usually perceived as troubled individuals, outside of the norm; it took me a long time to feel comfortable with being alone, with dampening the guilt that flared up in me every time I begged off going out with a group of friends.

It is always a welcome reinforcement when I come across a book penned by a fellow recluse—and The Book of Disquiet could be a solitary soul’s bible, so powerfully does it speak in the language of single-place table settings, corner-chair cobwebs and bachelor apartments. It has achieved pride of place on my bedside stack, where I can ladle myself servings of Pessoa’s wisdom at leisure. This book’s voluntarily alone author is Fernando Pessoa, a Portuguese poet, writer, and polylinguist who invented fully-fleshed out heteronyms —distinct and separate personalties of differing nationality and gender—in order to pursue his writing in various idiosyncratic shades and styles.

The Book of Disquiet is a collection of the aphoristic prose-poetry musings of one such heteronymthat of Bernardo Soares, assembled from notes, entries, and jottings made over a span of some thirty years and left unpublished at the time of Pessoa’s death in Richard Zenith, the editor and translator of this stunning, haunting, and achingly beautiful paean to the imaginary potentiality of man, has compiled the definitive edition of this tome in a truly outstanding translation that captures the expressive eloquence of Pessoa and his magical, metaphorically rich manner of constructing word images to portray his unique way of life.

There is no finer encomium to the shattering melancholy and bracing affirmation of loneliness and solitude than the five hundred plus entries that make up The Book of Disquiet ; and few better descriptions of existential nausea, of the desperate efforts to perceive a reason to continue with the painful disappointments, shadow terrors, and numbing meaninglessness of human existence.

As Pessoa—writing as Soares—quietly and unassumingly goes about his daily rituals of walking, working as a book-keeper and inhabiting the well-trod spaces of his rented room in the real world, he is living a rich existence within the wildly creative contours of his mind: Having been sentenced to a term of life by an errant universe, Pessoa decided to renounce action and ambitions in what we hold to be real life to pursue a variegated and abundant existence within the realm of dreams.

As our life is measured through the archived clippings of one’s memory, whether one actually performed the deeds recalled matters less than the detail and substance they contain. Such, at least, is the defense offered by Pessoa; yet often his solipsistic persuasions are contradictory, defensive; and when the mask slips we can see the depth of pain and loneliness underneath the placid surface of his imaginary life.

There is much repetition and mulling over of themes from different angles, but the writing is so expressive and raw and honest that, to myself at least, it never becomes tedious—even as the tedium of existence, the stretching of the soul on the rack of time, is one of the principal ideas that populate Pessoa’s thoughts and entries.

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It is as if tedium was experienced as a box of chocolates, each colour and coating, each form and flavour, each taste and texture, mulled over, pondered, drawn out and examined, and then set to paper as a running record to remind of an eccentric daily pleasure. This is a book to be mused upon and savored, one that can be imbibed in different ways: The order the aphorisms are assembled in is purely a construction of Zenith; he stresses such in his introduction and encourages each reader to create their own sequence for the collected entries.

However the reader decides to approach The Book of Disquietthey will be rewarded with the inventive honesty of a hale and wounded man from a work that is truly sui generis. Distinct from Zenith, obviously, but just as potent and powerful—and the differently parsed words and sentences only serve to present Pessoa’s incomparable poetry of loneliness in a new light, equally fulgent and searing, just focussed from an alternate angle.

A richly marbled interiority of immanent pain and transcendent beauty. View all 44 comments. I have this habit of keeping a pencil close by when I’m reading a book which I know is going to have some passages I want to remember. So, whenever I come across a sentence or a paragraph that strikes me for some reason, I underline it.

Well now, what’s mostly happened with my copy of the “The book of disquiet” by Fernando Pessoa is that there is something underlined in almost every page of the book. Which is the same to say that this is a memorable book on the whole. I’d even dare to say that th I have this habit of keeping a pencil close by when I’m reading a book which I know is going to have some passages I want to remember.

I’d even dare to say that this is more than a mere book, it is a gate to upper thinking, a new way of understanding the world, a new philosophy, a daring and maybe even scary but sincere approach to peasoa is hidden in our human souls, if we are brave enough to look.

I knew a bit of Pessoa before I picked up this book. Fednando known Portuguese poet, famous for his ability to create different “personalities” and stick to them closely to perfection, writing in different styles according to the voice of each character. Or the mind of a genius who fooled everyone who knew him?

Or a man who disguised himself out of boredom and who was able to live more than 70 different and complete lives through all these invented “characters” to become a ;essoa real person?

Maybe all these options at once. Anyway, even though I knew about Pessoa, I wasn’t prepared for this book. Not only unconnected recollections of the “supposed” life of Bernardo Soares, one of Pessoa’s characters, but also unanswerable questions fernanfo left me kind of anxious and peaceful fernahdo the fsrnando time, if that makes any sense Questions regarding consciousness, the almost obsession about dreams and the state of peaceful lethargy of sleeping, doubts aroused regarding deities, love and death.

And about what it is to be happy or to feel nostalgia about a non existent past, or about egoism and solitude. But all this questions made even more intense with this overflowing passion for writing, and for literature.

A privileged mind which opens for us, humble readers who want to witness an amazing transformation of the world surrounding us, seeing for the first time what our lives really are, or what they fernanddo and what we should expect them to be. An experience which will leave you exhausted but with renewed energy to face this extenuating and unavoidable journey which we call life.

View all 36 comments. With every sentence I read I felt myself being unwrapped, as layers of self-deceit and unconsciousness were shed. I could decide to open and close it. I could decide to put it away. But despite a 1 Some books wrap me up in dreams and fantasy, creating a protective bubble in which I can leisurely gaze at the world in comfort. Not through my mind, like good books. Not through my heart, like great books. It grasped my soul pesoa never let go.

This book is a mirror for my soul, a mirror in which my reflection always sees me first, a mirror where my reflection waves to me and I wave back. There is no plot weaving together the dsiquiet.